Child Custody Blog: A Weblog About Child Custody, Divorce, Child Custody Evaluations, Parenting, etc.
 

Child Custody Blog was created to provide our visitors with helpful and news worthy content, information, media, and commentary on the subject of Divorce and Child Custody. While this blog is primarily textual, you will find images, video and other media related to custody and divorce such as famous child custody battles, famous divorces, custody tips and more...

Orange County Child Custody Dispute Ends in Death of 4 Family Members

December 16th, 2009 · 1 Comment

Yet another horrific act of family violence has resulted in the death of four family members which reportedly stemmed from an Orange County California child custody dispute. Reportedly, authorities have indicated a woman has killed herself and three other family members, including two young children, in what may have started as a child custody dispute.

Reportedly, investigators are still trying to piece together events that led to the shooting deaths of a grandmother, her daughter and two granddaughters inside a million-dollar home in San Clemente, California on Monday, December 14, 2009. Child custody papers and court documents show that the mother had lost custody of the two youngest children/victims hours before the violence shattered a gated community. Orange County Commissioner Thomas Schulte was the family law judge or commissioner involved in the Orange County Superior Court child custody case. Investigators reportedly still don’t know which woman carried out the suspected murder-suicide, but each of the four died from a single gunshot wound, said Jim Amormino of the Orange County Sheriff’s Department. The girls’ father was ruled out as the killer, he said.

Recently in September 2009, Brian Benedict, 35, was accused of shooting his ex-wife Rebecca Benedict Clarke to death during an argument over child custody of the couple’s four year old son at UC Irvine. Benedict is awaiting trial. Orange County judge Nancy A. Pollard was the family law judge involved in the child custody case that resulted in the UCI shooting which also included a controversial ruling where UCI slaying suspect was ordered to more than double child support payments.

→ 1 CommentTags: Divorce Attorneys · Domestic Violence · Divorce · Family Law · Judges · Social Workers · Child Custody · Child Custody Attorneys · Child Support

Child Custody Battles – How to Prepare for a Child Custody Battle

December 13th, 2009 · 1 Comment

Are you involved in a child custody battle? Child custody battles for moms and dads are often times the most financially and emotionally draining part of the divorce process. Further, a child custody battle that involves litigation or a child custody evaluation can have a negative impact with lifelong consequences for the children. Parents who are able to work out a parenting plan for their children post-divorce without involving the family court, family law attorneys, judges, and child custody evaluators will often (1) have more control when it comes to decisions regarding the future of their children, (2) be more likely to have an amicable relationship going forward and come to agreements regarding their children in the future, (3) shield their children from family law officials and mental health professionals that may make the children feel as though they need to choose between the parents, and (4) save thousands in attorney fees and court related costs.

Not all child custody disputes need to end up in a child custody evaluation or in court with a judge making the decision about where the children will live after the divorce is finalized. Protracted child custody battles are often avoided when divorcing parents are able to set aside any negative feelings they have towards each other and focus on what’s in the best interest of their children. Also, once the family court is involved, the levels of trust between parents often decline making settlements much more difficult and in some cases impossible without help from an outside source. If parents are not able to workout their parenting and custody disagreements between each other, alternative dispute resolutions such as mediation should be sought first before involving attorneys and the court. In fact, many counties require parents to attend mediation before a child custody hearing can take place in front of a judge.

While child custody battles for fathers and mothers are often the most challenging part of a divorce, better long-term outcomes for the family and children are typically achieved when parents are able to work out their child custody issues out-of-court. Remember, “divorce involving children can draw out emotions, but emotions do not need to involve the children and draw out the divorce.

For information, tips and strategies on resolving child custody disputes out-of-court or to help you prepare for a child custody battle in court, the E-Book “How to Win Child Custodyby Steven Carlson, The Custody Coach™ is a must-have resource and will be an invaluable tool for you. To download it now with a 100% satisfaction guarantee click here. If you are seeking additional child custody help or one-on-one coaching, click here to schedule a phone or in-person meeting with Steve to discuss in detail your specific situation.

→ 1 CommentTags: Celebrity Divorce · Shared Parenting · Divorce Attorneys · Custody Evaluations · Parental Alienation · Divorce · Parenting Plans · Alternative Dispute Resolution · Family Law · Judges · Custody Evaluators · Mediators · Mental Health · Parenting · Mediation · Child Custody FAQs · Fee Arbitration · Child Custody · Unwed Parents · Paternity · Grandparents Rights · Custody Battles · Joint Custody · Hollywood Divorce · Child Custody Attorneys · Single Parenting · Child Custody Laws · Unmarried Child Custody · Sole Custody

Keeping People Sane in The Crazy World Of Child Custody Disputes

November 29th, 2009 · 1 Comment

Keeping People Sane in The Crazy World Of Child Custody Disputes

Child Custody Coach releases the E-Book How to Win Child Custody, in order to arm consumers with exclusive child custody information, tips and strategies.

Press Release (Vocus/PRWEB ) November 29, 2009 - Steven Carlson, The Custody Coach, is the founder of Child Custody Coach and author of the newly released e-book, How to Win Child Custody, is a Certified Parenting Instructor with extensive experience and training from the foremost professionals in the field of parenting techniques, co-parenting, child custody, attorney billing disputes, and the family court system.

While Carlson takes a nonjudgmental approach and is compassionate in helping parents involved in child custody disputes, he advocates that parents stay together for the benefit of their children and consider divorce or separation only as a last alternative when reconciliation is unachievable. However, he realizes that not all relationships will remain in tact; therefore his desire is to minimize the collateral damage that the breakdown of the relationship will have on the family and children.

Ultimately, post-divorce is about restructuring the family and coming up with a parenting plan that is in the best interest of the children. Not every child custody battle has to wind up in court, and oftentimes there are alternative dispute resolution options that don’t involve inordinately high legal fees and family upheaval. Parents need to put in time and effort to research the process and different outcomes that can be achieved for their specific cases, while not losing sight of what’s best for the children. It’s important for parents to not rely solely on an attorney for information and solutions. Child Custody Coach provides services tailored to help consumers get a handle on child custody issues, divorce, child custody evaluations, parenting, and attorney fee disputes.

Child Custody Coach is a fast and affordable way to learn about the family court system and the best steps they can take to remedy a particular child custody situation regardless of the stage of the custody dispute. Attorneys can often make clients feel neglected and uninformed, and fees will quickly incur even for simple questions. Therefore, Child Custody Coach empowers clients by providing information and strategies tailored to their specific case, that will ultimately help reduce legal fees and get their cases moving forward.

Some of the common coaching topics include parenting plans, child custody evaluations, initial custody determination, custody modifications, best interest of the child, move-aways or relocations and unwed parents and custody. Not every conflict between mom and dad has to end in divorce or a custody struggle. Child Custody Coach also offers guidance on non-legal disputes such as parenting skills and techniques, ongoing parental conflict, and parenting plans, so families can hopefully work out their problems without winding up in court.

The Custody Coach’s book How To Win Child Custody is a helpful tool loaded with proven strategies for resolving custody cases and saving clients thousands in attorney fees. The downloadable book comes with a 100% satisfaction guarantee, making it a risk free way to get answers to simple questions and a jump on research into this sphere of law. If clients have more questions or would prefer to speak with a real person, they can sign up for individualized coaching sessions over the phone, or meet in person in the Mission Viejo or Costa Mesa area in South Orange County California or Carlsbad area in North San Diego.

Steven Carlson, The Custody Coach, is the founder of Child Custody Coach and author of How to Win Child Custody, is a Certified Parenting Instructor with extensive experience and training from the foremost professionals in the field of child custody, co-parenting, parenting techniques, attorney billing disputes, and the family court system. He has applied his training and education to help parents across the nation with child custody related matters. He has been requested to speak on NPR, at school parent seminars, and was a featured divorce expert on a Newsday feature about the Christie Brinkley divorce.

For additional information or questions about Child Custody Coach or their services, contact thecustodycoach(at)childcustodycoach(dot)com.

Steven Carlson
Child Custody Coach
http://www.childcustodycoach.com/

→ 1 CommentTags: Shared Parenting · Divorce Attorneys · Custody Evaluations · Domestic Violence · False Allegations · Parental Alienation · Divorce · Parenting Plans · Alternative Dispute Resolution · Family Law · Collaborative Divorce · Judges · Custody Evaluators · Mediators · Parenting · Mediation · Child Custody FAQs · Fee Arbitration · Child Custody · Unwed Parents · Paternity · Grandparents Rights · Custody Battles · Famous Custody Battles · Christie Brinkley Divorce · Joint Custody · Hollywood Divorce · Child Custody Attorneys · Single Parenting · Child Custody Laws · Unmarried Child Custody · Sole Custody

More Fathers are Getting Custody in Divorce

November 19th, 2009 · No Comments

A couple years ago I put out an article on my website titled “More Fathers are Getting Custody” and have provided substantial material and information on the subject of child custody for fathers (I’ve done the same on child custody for mothers).

I noticed recently an article with a similar title called “More Fathers are Getting Custody in Divorce” appeared on the New York Times website. A question is asked at the end of this article, “If a mother works more, and a father less, is that a logical reason for the children to live with him?” This article references another article by Working Mother Magazine called “Custody Lost,” which told stories of breadwinning working mothers who lost custody to the father (some of which were stay-at-home dads). The opening paragraph mentions, “people inside and outside the courts say that the growing number of stay-at-home dads and breadwinner moms means more working mothers are fighting an unprecedented uphill battle.” I comment on these two quotes below.

Based on the article above, it looks like others agree that more fathers are getting custody. One of the reasons for this more recently being the economic plunge which has affected men more than woman in the workforce. As a result, more dads are at home with the kids while mom goes to work. Inevitably in this scenario, dad spends more time with the children than mom. So, “If a mother works more, and a father less, is that a logical reason for the children to live with him?” I don’t think so but the fact is that has been the logic the family court has used for decades in considering custody awards under the “best interest of the child standard” (this generally favors mothers who often work less or are the stay-at-home parent). Regardless of who works and who stays-at-home, divorce calls for a restructuring of the family post-divorce and to make the presumption that a working parent is not as fit as a non-working parent is absurd. Just as the “Tender Years Doctrine” was wrong to presume that a mother because of her sex is automatically a better parent than the father for younger children.

While it may be true that “the growing number of stay-at-home dads and breadwinner moms means more working mothers are fighting an unprecedented uphill battle,” this has been (is and will be) an uphill battle fathers have faced for decades under “the best interest of the child” standard, which replaced the “Tender Years Doctrine” (a legal presumption that awarded mothers custody of younger children in place for over a century). The philosophy of the courts penalizing the working parent is not new. The article above correctly points out that the family court favors non-working parents over working parents in custody awards. Of course, you will not see such language in the family code, but rather by outcomes of judicial rulings by the court and hearing from families affected by such rulings.

Overall, mothers are still being awarded custody majority of the time and fathers are more likely to face an uphill battle in the family court. It’s fathers who are more likely to be faced with work bias in addition to challenges related to domestic violence and restraining order law abuse, false abuse accusations, target of relocation or move-away cases, and the lingering affects the “Tender Years Doctrine” still has on many of the family courts today.

So, now that the shoe is on the other foot so-to-speak, will we see more working mothers favoring shared parenting arrangements and fighting for joint custody statutes? If fatherless homes are decreasing as a result of more fathers getting custody, will the statistics of children of fatherless homes result in a more positive outcome? I suppose time will only tell. Your thoughts?

→ No CommentsTags: Shared Parenting · Domestic Violence · False Allegations · Divorce · Parenting Plans · Family Law · Judges · Parenting · Child Custody · Custody Battles · Joint Custody · Child Custody Laws · Sole Custody

Shaq Divorce Rumors - Shaq’s Wife Shaunie O’Neal Files for Legal Separation

November 14th, 2009 · No Comments

Are the recent Shaq divorce rumors true? Reportedly, according to TMZ.com, the Shaquille O’Neal divorce rumors have merit as his wife Shaunie O’Neal apparently filed for legal separation in Los Angeles County Superior Court on Monday and cited “irreconcilable differences” for the reason for the split.

Shaunie O’Neal is reportedly asking for an unspecified amount of money for alimony and child support and seeking full child custody of the couple’s four minor children with visitation rights for Shaq O’Neal.

According to People.com, Shaunie O’Neal recently flew to Los Angeles and claimed herself a resident of The Golden State on Nov. 8, one day before filing the separation papers. Eventhough Shaq and Shaunie O’Neal live in Florida, Shaunie apparently claimed she is a resident of California, which has more generous community property divorce provisions than the state of Florida.

For full story on Shaq divorce rumors and legal separation click here.

→ No CommentsTags: Celebrity Divorce · Divorce · Family Law · Child Custody · Custody Battles · Hollywood Divorce · Child Support · Shaq Divorce · Sole Custody

Joint Custody - Levi Johnston to File for Joint Child Custody of Son with Former Fiancee Bristol Palin

November 10th, 2009 · No Comments

Reportedly, Levi Johnston said he is planning to file for legal joint custody of his 10-month-old son, Tripp, with former fiancee Bristol Palin. Levi Johnston, 19, has made claims in the past that the Palin family has prevented him from being alone with his son Tripp — And things have only gotten worse. Reportedly, he told The Insider, “Not working. I’m done,” “It’s going to have to go to court. They just finally pushed me over the edge.”

The feud between Levi Johnston and the Palin family heated up again last month when Levi said on CBS’s The Early Show that Sarah Palin referred to her infant son Trig, who has Down syndrome, as “retarded.” Sarah Palin reportedly shot back, saying, “We, like many, are appalled at the inflammatory statements being made or implied. Trig is our ‘blessed little angel’ who knows it and is lovingly called that every day of his life.” Sarah Palin also slammed Johnston for stripping down for Playgirl at a shoot scheduled to take place next week, saying, “Those who would sell their body for money reflect a desperate need for attention and are likely to say and do anything for even more attention.”

For full story click here.

→ No CommentsTags: Shared Parenting · Family Law · Parenting · Child Custody · Unwed Parents · Paternity · Custody Battles · Famous Custody Battles · Joint Custody · Single Parenting · Unmarried Child Custody